Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Lyndon Johnson Enchants The Dowager Sacred Feminine







Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy: Mr. President? 

President Johnson: I just wanted you to know you were loved and by so many and so much and- 

JBK: Oh, Mr. President! 

LBJ: -I'm one of them. 


JBK: I tried. I didn't dare bother you again, but I got Kenny O'Donnell over here to give you a message if he ever saw you. Did he give it to you yet? 

LBJ: No. 

JBK: About my letter? That was waiting for me last night? 

LBJ: Listen, sweetie. Now, first thing you've got to learn-you've got some things to learn, and one of them is that you don't bother me. You give me strength. 

JBK: But I wasn't going to send you in one more letter. I was so scared you'd answer. 

LBJ: Don't send me anything, don't send me anything! You just come on over and put your arm around me. That's all you do. When you haven't got anything else to do, let's take a walk. Let's walk around the back yard and just let me tell you how much you mean to all of us and how we can carry on if you give us a little strength! 

JBK: But you know what I wanted to say to you about that letter? I know how rare a letter is in a President's handwriting. Do you know that I've got more in your handwriting than I do in Jack's now? 

LBJ: Well- 

JBK: And for you to write it at this time, and then to send me that thing today of, you know, your Cape announcement and everything- 

LBJ: I want you to just know this, that I told my mama a long time ago, when everybody else gave up about my election in '48- 

JBK: Yes? 

LBJ: My mother and my wife and my sisters and you females got a lot of courage that we men don't have. And so we have to rely on you and depend on you, and you've got something to do. You've got the President relying on you. And this is not the first one you've had! So there're not many women, you know, running around with a good many Presidents. So you just bear that in mind. You've got the biggest job of your life! 

JBK: [laughs] "She ran around with two Presidents." That's what they'll say about me! 

LBJ: [quietly chortles] 


JBK: Okay! Anytime! 

LBJ: Goodbye, darling. 

JBK: Thank you for calling, Mr. President. Goodbye. 

LBJ: Bye, sweetie. Do come by. 

JBK: [warmly:] I will.

Saturday, December 7,1963, 5:20 P.M.
JBK: -tonight, will it be in the news? 

LBJ: It might be. I don't know.... I just had them come in the office, and they just sat around while I was drinking coffee. I don't know whether they even took TV of it, or not. I guess they did have some shining stuff in my eyes, but I don't imagine it's worth being on. 

JBK: Oh, listen. Oh, good, because I thought it might have been one of those things that went on while you were doing it.

LBJ: Did it keep you busy all day? 

JBK: Oh, listen, I'm just collapsed. I haven't gotten out of bed. 

LBJ: Your picture was gorgeous. Now you had that chin up and that chest out and you looked so pretty marching in the front page of the New York Daily News today, and I think they had the same picture in Washington. Little John-John and Caroline, they were wonderful, too. Have you seen the Daily News? The New York Daily News? 

JBK: No, but I haven't seen anything today except the [Washington] Post 'cause I just sort of collapsed, but they're all downstairs. 

LBJ: Well, you look at the New York Daily News. I'm looking at it now, and I just came, sat in my desk and started signing a lot of long things, and I decided I wanted to flirt with you a little bit. 

JBK: How sweet! And I read- Will you sleep in the White House tonight? 

LBJ: [laughs] I guess so. I'm paid to. 

JBK: Oh! ... You all three sleep in the same room, because it's the worst time, your first night. 

LBJ: Darling, you know what I said to the Congress-I'd give anything in the world if I wasn't here today. [laughs] 

JBK: Well, listen, oh, it's going to be funny because the rooms are all so big. You'll all get lost, but anyway- 

LBJ: You going to come back and see me? 

JBK: [chuckles] 

LBJ: Hmm? 

JBK: Some day I will. 

LBJ: Some day? 

JBK: But anyway, take a big sleeping pill. 

LBJ: Aren't you going to bring- You know what they do with me, they just keep my, they're just like taking a hypo, they just stimulate me and I just get every idea out of every head in my life comes back and I start thinking new things and new roads to conquer. 

JBK: Yeah? Great. 

LBJ: So I can't. Sleeping pill won't put me to sleep. It just wakes me up. 

JBK: Oh. 

LBJ: But if I know that you are going to come back to see me some morning when you are bringing your- 

JBK: I will. 

LBJ: -kid to school, and first time you do, please come and walk and let me walk down to the seesaw with you like old times. 

JBK: I will, Mr. President. 

LBJ: Okay. Give Caroline and John-John a hug for me. 

JBK: I will. 

LBJ: Tell them I'd like to be their daddy! 

JBK: I will. 

LBJ: Good-bye. 

JBK: Good-bye.

Saturday, December 21, 1963, 6:55 P.M.
LBJ: Jackie? 

JBK: Mr. President? 

LBJ: I love you! 

JBK: Aren't you sweet? Where are you? 

LBJ: You just skipped away from this town. I ought to have had you arrested! 

JBK: But I was so mad at myself. 

LBJ: Well, you ought to be mad. You almost made me mad at you leaving without coming by and hugging me and telling me goodbye. 

JBK: Yeah, but did you get my note? 

LBJ: Yes, I did. And I- 

JBK: ... I felt so stupid. 

LBJ: Well, I miss you, and I'm thinking of you and I know your Christmas won't be what it ought to be. But I wish that I could make it happier. 

JBK: Oh, well, you're so nice. And you know something, sending Luci Baines was so sweet when she brought those presents over. 

LBJ: Well- 

JBK: He just rode that fire engine around for two hours and broke all the Hammans' furniture. 

LBJ: [laughs] Well, you're mighty sweet. And I appreciate my book so much. Here's a little girl that wants to tell you hello. 

JBK: Okay. 

LADY BIRD: Jackie? 

JBK: Oh, Lady Bird? 

LADY BIRD: Yes! 

JBK: How are you? 

LADY BIRD: Oh, knee-deep in all sorts of decisions and unpacking and things, and the recalcitrant Congress, but also ready to go home and see kinfolks and sit by the fire and tell tales. 

JBK: Oh, and you go home when? 

LADY BIRD: Well, we were going home tomorrow night, immediately after lighting the Christmas tree, but now it's uncertain. 

JBK: I see. Oh, poor Lady Bird, with everything else you have, you just hit that place at Christmastime, too. 

LADY BIRD: [laughs] Just in front of Mr. Erhard. I hope that you have, that the children are gay and happy, and that the weather is beautiful and that you get some rest. 

JBK: Oh, you're so nice, Lady Bird. You're so thoughtful to think of me, and I know you've been calling Jayne Wrightsman, and you're just so sweet it makes me cry. 

LADY BIRD: Not at all. I've just got to get to work and learn a lot. Lyndon wants to say another word, and lots of love to you. 

JBK: Oh, same to you and all your family. 

LBJ: When I got ready to go to home for my Christmas, the Congress just said they'd spank me and hit me right in the face and wouldn't let me go, and that's the way I am going to do you next time if you don't tell me goodbye. 

JBK: Oh, listen, as soon as you get back, I'll come and get a vitamin-B shot from Dr. Travell. 

LBJ: Won't you do that? 

JBK: Yes. 

LBJ: Thank you, honey. ... Merry Christmas. 

JBK: Merry Christmas, Mr. President. 

LBJ: Give that little girl a hug for me. 

JBK: I will.

Monday, December 23,1963,7:18 P.M.
JBK: Mr. President? 

LBJ: I hope that you're doing all right. 

JBK: Oh, I'm doing fine, thank you. 

LBJ: Well, this Congress is getting pretty rough up here and I may have to send for you before it gets through. 

JBK: I hope you get home for Christmas. Will you? 

LBJ: I don't know. 

JBK: You're so nice to call me, Mr. President. You must be out of your mind with work piled up.

LBJ: I have a few things to do, but not anything that I enjoy more than what I'm doing now. 

JBK: You're nice. 

LBJ: How's my little girl? 

JBK: She's fine, and John just set off this awful jet plane, so it's noisy here in the background. 

LBJ: [laughs] Well, tell him hello, and I wish all of you a Merry Christmas, and I wished I could do something to make it happier for you. 

JBK: Oh, no, you are so nice, and you've done everything you could. ... Thank you so much.. .. 

LBJ: You know how much we love you? 

JBK: Oh, well, you're awfully nice. 

LBJ: You don't know? 

JBK: Well, no, I don't-well, yes, I do-you know. 

LBJ: You better know! All the 180 million love you, dear. 

JBK: Oh, thanks, Mr. President. 

LBJ: And all the world, and I'll see you after Christmas, I hope. And if you ever come back here again and don't come to see me, why, there's going to be trouble. 

JBK: All right. 

LBJ: You don't realize I have the FBI at my disposal, do you? 

JBK: [chuckles] No, I promise I will. 

LBJ: I'm going to send for you if you don't come by. 

JBK: Good. 

LBJ: Or someday they're going to create a traffic jam out there in Georgetown. 

JBK: Okay, well, that would be great. 

LBJ: You have a good Christmas, dear. 

JBK: Thank you. The same to you.



Wednesday, January 1,1964,6:10 P.M.
LBJ: Happy New Year! 

JBK: Oh, happy New Year, Mr. President! 

LBJ: How are you doing? 

JBK: Oh, I'm doing fine. 

LBJ: You getting some sunshine? 

JBK: [chuckles] It's pouring rain today. 

LBJ: We have a beautiful day here. 

JBK: Oh, I see. All of Texas- It looks so successful, the Erhard thing. That really went off beautifully, didn't it? 

LBJ: Yes, we had a good meeting. He's a pretty good fellow. 

JBK: Gosh, I thought you'd get some rest when you went home, but you did more than you do at the White House! ... You should go to bed. 

LBJ: Well, I did this afternoon. I just waked up. I'm still in bed and I just waked up thinking about you and wondering how you were getting along and what you did during the holidays. Did Santa Claus come see the kiddos? 

JBK: Oh, yes. You've been so nice to me. 

LBJ: I haven't been nice to you. I just, I want to see you. When are you coming back to Washington? 

JBK: Ahhh- Sunday. 

LBJ: Sunday? 

JBK: Yes. 

LBJ: Well, I'll probably come back Sunday, too. I haven't made up my mind, but that's pretty persuasive. 

JBK: [chuckles] Oh, but I will come to see you. ... I'll let you know. 

LBJ: Anytime, anytime! You just quit being so modest now. Did you have any fun at all? Did you get out on the water any? 

JBK: Oh, I did. I went swimming every day-And your present! Gosh, that Fairfax letter!... That's a treasure! 

LBJ: Well, you're sweet, you're sweet. 

JBK: You know, I grew up in Fairfax County. 

LBJ: Well, bless your heart. They did a good job on you. Tell me, does John like his automobile? 

JBK: Oh, he loves that so. That ladder! We have to take it down to the beach, up again ... down to the living room. 

LBJ: [chuckles] 

JBK: He's so mad about it. 

LBJ: I'm going to come see him when he gets back to Washington. 

JBK: She's so cute, Luci is. 

LBJ: Well, she was up to see the Navy game today. Lynda had mixed emotions. Her boyfriend was a Navy man and she was going to Texas. 

JBK: Oh, who won? ... The Secret Service all were betting on it. 

LBJ: Twenty-eight to six Navy. I mean Texas, Texas! Twenty-eight to six Texas. 

JBK: Oh, that's the Cotton Bowl.

LBJ: Yeah, that's right. 

JBK: I remember. 

LBJ: You sound cheerful. I hope you are. 

JBK: I'm getting so much better. It's always tough ... 

LBJ: I think you are a pretty great girl, myself.... I just wanted to hear your voice and wish you a happy New Year, and I'll see you next week. 

JBK: Great, Mr. President. You know, I'm so touched by [inaudible] with all you've got to do. 

LBJ: Well, I've got a lot to do with you yet, dear. 

JBK: Oh, I'd just do anything for you, because you've been so nice to me. 

LBJ: Goodbye, darling.

Thursday. January 9,1964,11:30 AM.
JBK: [laughs] 

LBJ: I'll resign! [laughs] Yeah, listen, I don't like these ten o'clock nights-lights still burning over here-and these early morning breakfast appointments. 

JBK: Will you please start to take a nap after lunch? 

LBJ: I'm going to. 

JBK: It changed Jack's whole life. 

LBJ: I'm going to. 

JBK: He was always sick. And when we got to the White House, he did it every day, even if you can't sleep. And you know, Churchill did that. And you just, now that you've got your State of the Union over, you just can't tear around. 

LBJ: I'll start it the day you come down here to see me, and if you don't, I'm going to come out there to see you. 

JBK: Oh, Mr. President- 

LBJ: And I will just have all those motor-sickle cops around your house, and it will cause you all kinds of trouble, and- 

JBK: I can't come down there. I wanted to tell you. I've really gotten ahold of myself. You know, I would do anything for you. I'll talk to you on the phone. I'm so scared I'll start to cry again. 

LBJ: Oh, you never cried-honey, I never saw anyone as brave as you. 

JBK: But I, you know- 

LBJ: Or as great. 

JBK: I just can't. 

LBJ: You know how great we think you are? 

JBK: Well, you know. I'll talk to you. I'll do anything I can. But don't make me come down there again. 

LBJ: Well, I've got to see you before long. I've got to see you. 

JBK: Well, any time you say is great. 

LBJ: All right. 

JBK: Thanks. 

LBJ: I'll call you sometime and come by. 

JBK: Okay.

LBJ: The Last Interview





Fabius




Fabius, being thus installed in the office of Dictator, in the first place gave the command of the horse to Lucius Minucius; and next asked leave of The Senate for himself, that in time of battle he might serve on horseback, which by an ancient law amongst the Romans was forbid to their generals; whether it were, that, placing their greatest strength in their foot, they would have their commanders-in-chief posted amongst them, or else to let them know, that, how great and absolute soever their authority were, the people and senate were still their masters, of whom they must ask leave. Fabius, however, to make the authority of his charge more observable, and to render the people more submissive and obedient to him, caused himself to be accompanied with the full body of four-and-twenty lictors; and, when the surviving consul came to visit him, sent him word to dismiss his lictors with their fasces, the ensigns of authority, and appear before him as a private person. 

The first solemn action of his dictatorship was very fitly a religious one: an admonition to the people, that their late overthrow had not befallen them through want of courage in their soldiers, but through the neglect of divine ceremonies in the general. He therefore exhorted them not to fear the enemy, but by extraordinary honour to propitiate the gods. This he did, not to fill their minds with superstition, but by religious feeling to raise their courage, and lessen their fear of the enemy by inspiring the belief that Heaven was on their side. With this view, the secret prophecies called the Sibylline Books were consulted; sundry predictions found in them were said to refer to the fortunes and events of the time; but none except the consulter was informed. Presenting himself to the people, the dictator made a vow before them to offer in sacrifice the whole product of the next season, all Italy over, of the cows, goats, swine, sheep, both in the mountains and the plains; and to celebrate musical festivities with an expenditure of the precise sum of 333 sestertia and 333 denarii, with one-third of a denarius over. The sum total of which is, in our money, 83,583 drachmas and 2 obols. What the mystery might be in that exact number is not easy to determine, unless it were in honour of the perfection of the number three, as being the first of odd numbers, the first that contains in itself multiplication, with all other properties whatsoever belonging to numbers in general. 

In this manner Fabius, having given the people better heart for the future, by making them believe that the gods took their side, for his own part placed his whole confidence in himself, believing that the gods bestowed victory and good fortune by the instrumentality of valour and of prudence; and thus prepared he set forth to oppose Hannibal, not with intention to fight him, but with the purpose of wearing out and wasting the vigour of his arms by lapse of time, of meeting his want of resources by superior means, by large numbers the smallness of his forces. With this design, he always encamped on the highest grounds, where the enemy's horse could have no access to him. Still he kept pace with them; when they marched he followed them; when they encamped he did the same, but at such a distance as not to be compelled to an engagement and always keeping upon the hills, free from the insults of their horse; by which means he gave them no rest, but kept them in a continual alarm. 

But this his dilatory way gave occasion in his own camp for suspicion of want of courage; and this opinion prevailed yet more in Hannibal's army. Hannibal was himself the only man who was not deceived, who discerned his skill and detected his tactics, and saw, unless he could by art or force bring him to battle, that the Carthaginians, unable to use the arms in which they were superior, and suffering the continual drain of lives and treasure in which they were inferior, would in the end come to nothing. 

He resolved, therefore, with all the arts and subtleties of war to break his measures and to bring Fabius to an engagement, like a cunning wrestler, watching every opportunity to get good hold and close with his adversary. He at one time attacked, and sought to distract his attention, tried to draw him off in various directions, and endeavoured in all ways to tempt him from his safe policy. All this artifice, though it had no effect upon the firm judgment and conviction of the Dictator, yet upon the common soldier, and even upon the General of the Horse himself, it had too great an operation: Minucius, unseasonably eager for action, bold and confident, humoured the soldiery, and himself contributed to fill them with wild eagerness and empty hopes, which they vented in reproaches upon Fabius, calling him Hannibal's pedagogue, since he did nothing else but follow him up and down and wait upon him. 

At the same time, they cried up Minucius for the only captain worthy to command the Romans; whose vanity and presumption rose so high in consequence, that he insolently jested at Fabius's encampment upon the mountains, saying that he seated them there as on a theatre, to behold the flames and desolation of their country. 

And he would sometimes ask the friends of the General, whether it were not his meaning, by thus leading them from mountain to mountain, to carry them at last (having no hopes on Earth) up into Heaven, or to hide them in the clouds from Hannibal's army? 

When his friends reported these things to The Dictator, persuading him that, to avoid the general obloquy, he should engage The Enemy, his answer was, 

"I should be more faint-hearted than they make me, if, through fear of idle reproaches, I should abandon my own convictions. 

It is no inglorious thing to have fear for the safety of our country, but to be turned from one's course by men's opinions, by blame, and by misrepresentation, shows a man unfit to hold an office such as this, which, by such conduct, he makes the slaves of those whose errors it is his business to control." 

Friday, 15 September 2017

Puppets




[Ashildr's home]


(Ashildr is challenging a shadow cast on a skin by candlelight.)

ASHILDR: 
So, we meet again, Fake Odin. Valhalla burns around you, your army is destroyed and now it is time for you to die

(She attacks her model of Odin with a wooden stave. The Doctor stands in the doorway and clears his throat.)

ASHILDR: 
How long have you been there? 

DOCTOR: 
What's that? Is that a puppet? Oh, I love puppets! 

ASHILDR: 
I make puppets sometimes, when I'm...

DOCTOR: 
Frightened? 

ASHILDR: 
When the raiding parties go out, I make up stories about their battles. 

DOCTOR: 
Because if you make up the right story, then you think it will keep them safe and they'll all come home. 

That's okay. 

You're not the first person to ever have done that. 

ASHILDR: 
Why are you here?  

DOCTOR: 
I'm looking for something I'm missing. 
What do you think our chances are tomorrow? 

ASHILDR: 
We will be cut down like corn. 
By this time tomorrow, every single one of us will be dead. 

DOCTOR: 
Yeah. 

(He picks up an illuminated bound book and briefly leaves through it.)

DOCTOR: 
You could go. 

ASHILDR: 
There's nowhere for me except here. 

This is my place. 

The sky, the hills, the sea, the people. 
Is there nowhere like that for you? 

DOCTOR: 
Oh, I like a nice view as much as anyone. 

ASHILDR: 
But?  

DOCTOR: 
Can't wait for the next one. 

ASHILDR: 
I pity you. 

DOCTOR: 
I will mourn for you. I know which I'd prefer. 

ASHILDR: 
You think they're all idiots, don't you? 

DOCTOR: 
What, you mean the rest of the universe? 
Basically, yes, I do. 

ASHILDR: 
But they're kind and brave, and strong, and I love them. 

DOCTOR: 
Good. Good. But that won't save you. 

ASHILDR: 
I've always been different. All my life I've known that. 
The girls all thought I was a boy. The boys all said I was just a girl. 

My head is always full of stories. 
I know I'm strange. Everyone  knows I'm strange. 
But here I'm loved. 

You tell me to run to save my life. 
I tell you that leaving this place would be death itself. 

(Her father enters.)

EINARR: 
I cannot keep you safe. I do not have the strength. 
But I will try to till the last beat of my heart. 

(The baby cries as Einarr hugs Ashildr.)

EINARR: 
If you seek to mock me in this moment 

DOCTOR: 
No. No. No, you go ahead and you cry all you like. 
Speaking of crying, is that baby getting closer? 

(Lofty walks through the village carrying the baby.)

DOCTOR: 
Why has Lofty stolen a baby?
ASHILDR: 
That's his child. 

DOCTOR: 
Oh. Where's he taking her? 

ASHILDR: 
The boathouse. He takes her to the boathouse when she won't settle. She likes the fish. 

DOCTOR: 
Why would she? Fire in the water. 
Fire in the water. Fire in the Fire in the water. 
Fire in the water? Fire in the water! 
That's it. That's it. That's what I've been missing. 
Clara, I've found it! 

(He runs out.)

DOCTOR: 
Clara! Clara! 

The Urban Hermit







"...that idea of The Far-Off Man, way, way out there,  but what does the Hermit tell us...?


If you try this get as lonely as you can get, you become visibly aware which you can't get away from it, because when you get very lonely very fast you become extremely thin and everything that goes on is or now ordinarily unnoticed cum spiritum 

First of all, you will find that there is a  Community of Insects.

And they are tremendously interested in You, and not necessarily hostile, in maybe some cases they are so.

But alone in The Forest, when you get really quiet, you'll notice little creatures will come and inspect you look you all over an
they'll go away and tell their friends and they'll come and look to see what it is and you become aware of every single sound and you realize that alone you're in the midst of a vast burning crowd - it may not be human but it's everything else - so
that the the point of being honest the discipline leads you to understand that you can't resign;

The lonelier you are, the more you're joined together with everything else. 



Look at it - from another point of view, supposing I say everybody's playing the game Me First  - now, I'm going to play the game You Firstto use the phrase of Bonhoeffer who called Jesus The Man for Others now let's see if we could play that game instead of Me First, You First 

Or,

"I'm the one see who's so generous I'm the one who's so loving so self-effacing and all you insolent brats ...."

Thursday, 14 September 2017

The Wilderness






Wildernesses are good places, I notice, for voices.

They tend to get a reverberation which is often lost in the more crowded places.







Archangel Michael, Protect Us in Battle


O glorious prince St. Michael,

 chief and commander of the heavenly hosts,

 guardian of souls, vanquisher of rebel spirits, 
servant in the house of the Divine King 
and our admirable conductor,
 you who shine with excellence 
and superhuman virtue deliver us from all evil
, who turn to you with confidence 
and enable us by your gracious protection
 to serve God more and more faithfully every day.
PRAYER TO

SAINT MICHAEL

THE ARCHANGEL

St. Michael the Archangel, 

defend us in battle. 

Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the Devil. 
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, 
and do thou, 
O Prince of the heavenly hosts, 
by the power of God, 
thrust into hell Satan, 
and all the evil spirits, 
who prowl about the world 
seeking the ruin of souls. Amen..




  

  Mickey: [Flashback] 
Ah come here Rock. My God, you're ready ain't ya? 
That Apollo won't know what hit him. 
You're gonna roll over him like a bulldozer, an Italian bulldozer.

You know kid, I know how you feel about this fight that's comin' up. 'Cause I was young once, too. 

And I'll tell you somethin'. 

Well, if you wasn't here I probably wouldn't be alive today. 

The fact that you're here and doin' as well as you're doin' gives me-what do you call it-motivization? Huh? To stay alive, 'cause I think that people die sometimes when they don't wanna live no more. 

Rocky Balboa: [Present day, remembering] 
Nature's smarter than people think... 

Mickey: [Flashback] 

And nature is smarter than people think. 

Little by little we lose our friends, we lose everything. 

We keep losin' and losin' till we say you know, 
'Oh what the hell am I livin' around here for? I got not reason to go on.' 

But with you kid, boy, I got a reason to go on. 

And I'm gonna stay alive and I will watch you make good... 

Rocky Balboa: [Present day, remembering] 
I'll never leave you.

Mickey: [Flashback] 
...and I'll never leave you until that happens. 

'Cause when I leave you you'll not only know how to fight, you'll be able to take care of yourself outside the ring too, is that okay? 

Rocky Balboa: [Flashback] 
It's okay. 

Mickey: [Flashback] 
Okay. Now I got a little gift for you. 

Rocky Balboa: [Flashback] 
Ah, Mick you don't have to. 

Mickey: [Flashback] 
No, wait a minute, now, wait a minute. Hey look at that. 


[Takes off his golden glove necklace]

Mickey
See that? This is the favorite thing that I have on this Earth. 

And Rocky Marciano give me that. 
You know what it was? His cufflink. Huh? 

And now I'm givin' it to you and it, it's gotta be like a, like an angel on your shoulder see? If you ever get hurt and you feel that you're goin' down this little angel is gonna whisper in your ear. 

It's gonna say, 

'Get up you son of a bitch...! 
'cause Mickey loves you'. 

Okay? 

Rocky Balboa: [Flashback] 
Thanks Mick. 

[Hugs him]

I love you too. 

Mickey: [Flashback] 
Go after him kid, go after him.


Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Ashes in The Fall


LADY VERSION :
I loved being you. 

Every second of it. 

Oh, the way you burn like a sun. 




Like a whole screaming world on fire. 


remember that feeling, and I always will. 



And I will always miss it. 


Perfect 10:
Where are you now..? 


Nyssa & Tegan? 

Cybermen & Mara & Time Lords in funny hats?

And the Master? 
Oh, he just showed up again, same as ever. 

The Chorister : 
Oh no, really? Does he still have that rubbish beard? 

Perfect 10: 
No, no beard this time. 

Well, a wife. 

The Chorister: 
What can I say? 
Thank you, Doctor.

Perfect 10 : 
Thank you. 

The Chorister: 
I'm very welcome. 


(The Chorister vanishes. Perfect 10 flips some switches and brings him back to return his hat.



Perfect 10 : 
You know, I love being you. 

Back when I first started at the very beginning, I was always trying to be old and grumpy and important, like you do when you're young. 

And then I was you, and it was all dashing about and playing cricket and my voice going all squeaky when I shouted. 

I still do that, the voice thing! 

I got that from you. Oh, and the trainers, and :-

(He puts his BrainySpex on.

Perfect 10 : 
Snap. Because you know what, Doctor?
You were my Doctor.

The Chorister : To days to Come. 

Perfect 10: 
All My Love to Long Ago. 



Ashes 2 Ashes,
Funk 2 Funky,
We No Mjr. Tom's a Junky :

IN DUST WE TRUST



https://youtu.be/Nv7qh_XL_yM